CONSULTING 8:30am - 6:30pm, Monday - Friday
24 HOURS PER DAY, 7 DAYS A WEEK in case of emergency

Tracheal Collapse

March 26th, 2020

Up to 71% of dogs with tracheobronchial collapse can be successfully managed with medications for more than 12 months* . Where medical management is no longer sufficient, tracheal stenting should be considered and is a viable option for relieving life threatening airway obstruction and can significantly improve quality of life. Tracheal stenting offers a high survival rate, even in those patients with severe clinical signs. The internal medicine service offers assessment of cases for tracheal stenting and this procedure can be performed on-site.

* White R, Williams JM. Tracheal collapse in the dog-is there really a role for surgery? A survey of 100 cases. J Small Anim Pract 1994;35(4):191–6.

Diabetic Cats

March 24th, 2020

The factors which increase the chances of achieving diabetic remission in cats include:

  • Low carbohydrate diet
  • Long acting insulin eg glargine
  • Older age
  • Early institution of tight glycemic control
  • Recent steroid administration
  • Absence of diabetic neuropathy
  • Lower serum cholesterol concentration

The protocol for achieving diabetic remission needs to be matched with the right owner. If you have a newly diagnosed diabetic cat case, consider referral to the internal medicine service of NVS for discussion as to whether the cat and owners are good candidates for a diabetic remission protocol.

Hypothyrodism – When Will Clinical Signs Likely Resolve?

March 17th, 2020

When treating hypothyroidism in dogs, it is important to set realistic time frames for resolution of clinical signs. As a rough guide, clinical signs should respond within the following timelines with appropriate treatment:

  • Mentation and activity = 2-7 days
  • Lipaemia and other clinical pathologic changes = 2-4 days
  • Dermatologic abnormalities = 2-4 months
  • Neurological abnormalities = 1-3 months
  • Cardiac abnormalities = 1-2 months
  • Reproductive abnormalities  = 3-10 months

Masticatory Myositis

March 12th, 2020

When presented with a possible case of masticatory myositis, it is important to remember there are two potential presentation types: acute and chronic forms.

Clinical signs associated with the acute form include:

  • Fever
  • Regional lymphadenopathy
  • Muscles of mastication swelling which are painful on palpation
  • Exophthalmos
  • Resists or unable to open the mouth

Clinical signs associated with the chronic form include:

  • Atrophy of the masticatory muscles
  • Muscle swelling/atrophy can be asymmetric
  • Enophthalmos
  • Inability to open mouth fully

Steroid Responsive Meningitis Arteritis

March 10th, 2020

We are learning more and more about steroid responsive meningitis arteritis (SRMA). This article published in JSAP (2019) by Spence et al. highlights that a significant number of dogs with SRMA also had cardiac abnormalities, including decreased fractional shortening, increased left ventricular dimensions, spontaneous echocontrast, pericardial effusions and increased cardiac troponins. Most of these abnormalities resolved with appropriate treatment for SRMA. However, in some cases where there was a clinical response noted for neck pain etc, the change in fractional shortening and left ventricular dimensions did not always resolve.

Last Chance to RSVP!

March 6th, 2020

The annual NEVS / NVS Trivia Night is coming up next Thursday, March 12th. If you haven’t already booked your table call us on 9452 2933 or email admin@northsidevetspecialists.com.au asap!

It’s Trivia Time!

February 14th, 2020

Save the date – our annual CPD Trivia Night will be held on Thursday, March 12th from 7:30pm. RSVP today to admin@northsidevetspecialists.com.au or 02 9452 2933

See attached flyer for more details :)

Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) Therapy Now Available at NVS!

January 23rd, 2020

Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) Injections have gained popularity in the human-world in the last few years – perhaps you’ve even had one yourself for a torn ACL, rotator cuff injury, tendinitis, or the like.

These injections have shown huge potential for our patients as well, particularly in the management of osteoarthritis, or tendon or ligament injuries. Northside Vet Specialists are excited to announce that we are now able to provide this therapy in hospital. The procedure is relatively quick, safe, and very effective.

If you have any questions, or have a patient that you feel would benefit from this procedure, please have a chat to a member of our surgical team on 9452 2933!

Video Capsule Endoscopy Now Available at NVS!

January 21st, 2020

Working up gastro-intestinal disease can be incredibly frustrating, but especially so in pets with co-existing problems that make anaesthetic procedures higher-risk.

Often we would recommend endoscopy to directly visualise the stomach and intestines, and potentially take biopsies at the same time. In higher-risk patients however, a less-invasive option would allow us to see the gastro-instestinal tract, and make an informed decision about whether a more invasive procedure is warranted. Enter video capsule endoscopy. This pill-sized capsule contains multiple cameras that take thousands of pictures as it makes its way through the body. No anaesthetic required- we just give the capsule by mouth, and wait for it to reappear…

:wink:

Capsule endoscopy is a great option for those cases where either the patient or the client would benefit from a low-risk, stepwise approach to diagnosis.

If you have any questions, or have a patient that you feel may be a candidate, have a chat with a member of our Medicine team! 9452 2933

NVS Diagnostic Imaging Service Expanding!

January 13th, 2020

We are thrilled to welcome Dr. Mariano Makara, Specialist in Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging to the NVS team. Mariano will be at NVS on Wednesdays and Thursdays, and is available for both external imaging procedures, as well as to support our internal specialists with CTs, MRI, Ultrasound, Videofluoroscopy, and interventional procedures.