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24 HOURS PER DAY, 7 DAYS A WEEK in case of emergency

Steroid Responsive Meningitis Arteritis

March 10th, 2020

We are learning more and more about steroid responsive meningitis arteritis (SRMA). This article published in JSAP (2019) by Spence et al. highlights that a significant number of dogs with SRMA also had cardiac abnormalities, including decreased fractional shortening, increased left ventricular dimensions, spontaneous echocontrast, pericardial effusions and increased cardiac troponins. Most of these abnormalities resolved with appropriate treatment for SRMA. However, in some cases where there was a clinical response noted for neck pain etc, the change in fractional shortening and left ventricular dimensions did not always resolve.

Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) Therapy Now Available at NVS!

January 23rd, 2020

Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) Injections have gained popularity in the human-world in the last few years – perhaps you’ve even had one yourself for a torn ACL, rotator cuff injury, tendinitis, or the like.

These injections have shown huge potential for our patients as well, particularly in the management of osteoarthritis, or tendon or ligament injuries. Northside Vet Specialists are excited to announce that we are now able to provide this therapy in hospital. The procedure is relatively quick, safe, and very effective.

If you have any questions, or have a patient that you feel would benefit from this procedure, please have a chat to a member of our surgical team on 9452 2933!

Video Capsule Endoscopy Now Available at NVS!

January 21st, 2020

Working up gastro-intestinal disease can be incredibly frustrating, but especially so in pets with co-existing problems that make anaesthetic procedures higher-risk.

Often we would recommend endoscopy to directly visualise the stomach and intestines, and potentially take biopsies at the same time. In higher-risk patients however, a less-invasive option would allow us to see the gastro-instestinal tract, and make an informed decision about whether a more invasive procedure is warranted. Enter video capsule endoscopy. This pill-sized capsule contains multiple cameras that take thousands of pictures as it makes its way through the body. No anaesthetic required- we just give the capsule by mouth, and wait for it to reappear…

:wink:

Capsule endoscopy is a great option for those cases where either the patient or the client would benefit from a low-risk, stepwise approach to diagnosis.

If you have any questions, or have a patient that you feel may be a candidate, have a chat with a member of our Medicine team! 9452 2933

In the News

January 11th, 2019

Rethinking Age of Desexing

Say What Now?!

What age should we be desexing dogs? Well, that’s controversial. The AVA recommend desexing somewhere between 4 months and 1 year of age, at the vet’s discretion. Below is a great summary of the impact of desexing (Goh, Compendium August 2016 – the full article is free to access at the Compendium website) – Longevity is increased in desexed dogs, but we can see that it predisposes to a number of other conditions. My approach is very breed dependent – For example, Dachshunds desexed early (<12 months) have double the risk of intervertebral disc disease than late desexed dogs, so I would recommend between 12 – 18 months for them.

Cruciate ligament disease is more common in large breed dogs desexed at <6mo, so I would delay to 12 months. The trend towards desexing females at 6 months of age was due to the increasing risk of mammary tumours with each oestrus cycle (Schneider et al, 1969), which has been challenged in a recent publication which suggests desexing females at <2.5y rather than before oestrus onset) (Bronden et al, Vet Rec. 2010). There are several papers available referring to individual breeds, their predispositions and the recommendations for desexing.

#foodforthoughtfriday

In The News

January 3rd, 2019

Grain Free Diets

Recent research has made the association between dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), and grain free diets, but what exactly in the diet is causing this? This was originally assumed to be associated with Taurine deficiency, but a recent study shows that 90% of dogs with DCM have NORMAL taurine levels! (link to a great article about this here http://vetnutrition.tufts.edu/2018/11/dcm-update/).

So what should we be recommending for our patients? The reality is that nothing is right for all patients. The boutique brands are poorly quality controlled, home cooked diets rarely meet nutritional requirements, and raw food diets carry infectious and zoonotic risks. Luckily, veterinary nutritionists can provide online consultations and unbiased commercial recommendations for the patients with special needs (eg that cat with diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease and chronic kidney disease). Contact us on 9452 2933 for more information or to submit a request.